Kehinde Wiley in Cleveland

  Kehinde Wiley, Napoleon Leading the Army Over the Alps (Self-Portrait),Oil on canvas, 2005

 Artist Kehinde Wiley will speak at Cleveland Museum of Art's Gartner Auditorium, Saturday August 29th at 2:00. His beautiful work harks back to an earlier style while creating very modern portraits. Wiley's recent one man exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum was very well received by the art world and the public, alike. The Cleveland lecture is part of the Cleveland Public Library's The Lockwood Thompson Dialogues.



Kehinde Wiley Triple Portrait of Charles I, oil and enamel on canvas. Triptych, 2007, 

The Armory Show - Then and Now

 Gallery A in the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art (nicknamed "Armory" Show)

The International Exhibition of Modern Art (The Armory Show) of 1913 was a pivotal time in the world of art. It marked the first time that art considered to be the "modern" style was brought together and exhibited in one space. It took over a year of planning and received much public scorn from people unaccustomed and uninterested the burgeoning styles displayed like Cubism, Fauvism and Futurism.

 Currently, there is an exhibition of the same name taking place in New York at the Piers which highlights art of the 20th and 21st centuries and is primarily a venue to buy and sell. However, if you have the opportunity, it is also a chance to see works by famous and unknown artists in the same locations.


2014 Armory Show in New York through March 9, 2014

Supreme Painting


Suprematist Composition, 1916 by Kazimir Malevich

During the closing ceremonies of the Olympics in Sochi last night, reference was made to Ukrainian artist Kazimir Malevich, but not much else was said about him. He is one of the most important artists of the 20th century, less famous than Picasso, but no less important. This is considered to be one of the most important pieces of 20th century art and in his treatise of 1916 Malevich explained that he wanted to concentrate on color and texture and to move beyond traditional representation.